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Favorite option: If you want this item to be marked as a favorite, click on the black heart.   Low VEERY slow!  
  
Wayne Nagy - Jul 08   Viewers  | Reply
    My son recorded this pass with his iPhone while standing on a paddle board 1/2 mile out in the Gulf near Captiva.      Attachments:  

Searey SLOW
Searey SLOW


    
  
Nickens, Dan - Jul 09   Viewers  | Reply
    Beautiful pass, Wayne!     
  
Don Maxwell - Jul 09   Viewers  | Reply
    Oo! I love that ultra-slow effect, Wayne. It reminds me of the original "Six Million Dollar Man" TV series that (as I recall) was among the first to indicate hyper-fast movement with slo-mo.     
  
Wayne Nagy - Jul 10   Viewers  | Reply
    Here is a pass on the same day at regular speed......      Attachments:  

Searey low pass
Searey low pass


    
  
Don Maxwell - Jul 11   Viewers  | Reply
    Just for the sake of experimentation--to see what the useful limits are--here's the regular speed video accelerated to 2x, 3x, and 4x:      Attachments:  

Wayne3x
Wayne3x


Wayne4x
Wayne4x


       Attachments:  

Wayne2x
Wayne2x


    
  
Wayne Nagy - Jul 11   Viewers  | Reply
    Big speed difference as you changed engines on the plane, Don! :-)     
  
Don Maxwell - Jul 11   Viewers  | Reply
    Well, the question is, What's the optimum video speed to suggest a fast flyby? It seems to me that 3x and 4x are too fast in this case because it's hard to see the airplane as it passes the camera. (If the distance had been greater, those speeds might look better.) Of the 5 speeds we have here, I like your original "Searey SLOW" best. It works like the TV series slow motion running shots and the extreme slo-mo bullet-dodging shots in the <I>Matrix</I> movies. It seems to alter my sense of time in such a way that the airplane seems to be moving at great speed.

The audio enhances the effect in your SLOW video. I hadn't thought about it much before, but I've just watched it several times in a row. The airplane noise is slowed so much that it seems we can hear individual whacks of the prop blades, like a helicopter rotor. It's a very spooky effect. The prop is slowed in the video portion, too, and the video and audio seem nicely in sync.

The only reason the speeded-up versions work at all is that the air--and the Searey's motion--was so smooth that when speeded up it's still smooth. Jerky would just look silly.

Unfortunately for me, I don't think there's any way to make FinalCut (Apple's best video editor) alter the playback audio along with the video speed. It probably has to be done in the recording, rather than in post-processing.

Here's a really silly example, at 1/10th speed:
     Attachments:  

Wayne-10slo
Wayne-10slo


    
  
Don Maxwell - Jul 11   Viewers  | Reply
    Found it: a "Preserve Pitch" switch. It works, but at 1/10 speed, we're seeing individual video frames, so the supersmoothslow effect is lost.      Attachments:  

Wayne-10slo-PreservePitch
Wayne-10slo-PreservePitch


    
  
Carr, Frank  - Jul 10   Viewers  | Reply
    Both are good. Would you ask him stay out there to video me when I'm finished with my Annual?     
  
Carr, Frank  - Jul 10   Viewers  | Reply
    On his paddle board? Standing? With his iPhone? Video taping? Next you're telling us the 3 kids were aboard as well.     
  
Robert Richardson IV - Jul 13   Viewers  | Reply
    Nice use of the iPhone's slow motion video feature.
Just like Don's have sought the right video speed rate in my FinalCut Pro produced videos. To cutdown on video dead to me, I
have found 300-400% increase works nicely for long straight runs along a low level coastal runs or long taxi events. While
200% work nicely for splash&gos. Slowing it down to 25-50% is good for highlighting a monument like a fly by. I have yet to
workout how best to capture formation flying, since GoPros are poor at capturing the closeup effect of anything beyond
fingertip formation. It's 170' wide angle angle makes it hard. A DSRL camera could do it, but that would require a passenger
cameraperson.
    

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